Teacher's Portal

TROPE: Teachers' Resources for Online Privacy Education. On this page, you will find classroom-ready lesson modules for the Ten Principles for Online Privacy, along with background material to help you teach about privacy in the classroom. The activities and other elements in the lesson modules are designed to be flexible, so you can use a whole module "out of the box" or pick and choose particular elements.

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Classroom Resources for Each of the Ten Principles

You’re Leaving Footprints (Module 1)

Principle: Your information footprint is larger than you think.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can enumerate ways their online and offline activities contribute to their information “footprint”; students can use privacy settings and critical thinking skills to limit the exposure of their footprint.

There’s No Anonymity (Module 2)

Principle: There is no anonymity on the Internet.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can explain (in general terms) how data tracked by online services can be used to identify them; students can use tools and techniques to reduce the effectiveness of tracking.

Information Is Valuable (Module 3)

Principle: Information about you on the Internet will be used by somebody in their interest — including against you.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can give examples of how their data may be used to benefit others; students can investigate and evaluate how different online services use data, in order to make informed choices.

Someone Could Listen (Module 4)

Principle: Communication over a network, unless strongly encrypted, is never just between two parties.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can articulate how the multi-step, multi-party pathways of networked communication affect users’ privacy; students can identify and use more secure communication options.

Sharing Releases Control (Module 5)

Principle: Sharing information over a network means you give up control over that information — forever.

Summary of Learning Objectives:Students can enumerate ways their information may be recorded, re-shared, and reinterpreted once it is online; students can use privacy settings and imaginative self-inquiry to limit potentially harmful sharing.

Search Is Improving (Module 6)

Principle: Just because something can’t be found today, doesn’t mean it can’t be found tomorrow.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can explain how changes in technology and regulations can affect who has access to their data; students can use techniques to monitor and limit the exposure of their data.

Online Is Real (Module 7)

Principle: The online world is inseparable from the “real” world.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can give examples of how online and offline activities affect each other; students can think imaginatively about the potential consequences of their posts for themselves and others.

Identity Isn’t Guaranteed (Module 8)

Principle: Identity is not guaranteed on the Internet.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can explain why it is difficult to be sure who one is communicating with online; students can investigate and evaluate the legitimacy of services that want their personal information.

You Can’t Escape (Module 9)

Principle: You can’t avoid having an information footprint by not going online.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can enumerate ways their offline activities generate data that is stored and shared online; students can communicate effectively with others about everyone’s information-sharing preferences.

Privacy Requires Work (Module 10)

Principle: Only you have an interest in maintaining your privacy.

Summary of Learning Objectives: Students can articulate why technology design, laws, and business policies do not inherently protect their privacy; students have the capacity to acquire new privacy-management skills as technology and policies change.

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